Is Training Worth the Cost? ….it depends

Proposal cookbook training is marginally beneficial for increasing one’s knowledge of the terms, languaging, and techniques of the art and science of proposal writing. Our approach includes classical rhetoric, arts of persuasion, appeals to logic, reason, authority, and the psychology associated with graphics, in addition to the basic cookbook body of knowledge.

Our research has indicated that more than 66% of those who received traditional cookbook proposal training have been dissatisfied, since they felt they were exposed to a majority of knowledge already known or because the course’s emphasis was on “what to do” rather than “how to do it”.

We recommend a workshop forum using the incumbent or draft solicitation. GRE’s proposal coaching is an educational seminar which uses an advanced solicitation and focuses on sample tasks and write-ups which are collaboratively improved by the students through coaching. The results are then used in the actual submittal. This process has proven successful, as demonstrated by our clients’ testimonials.

A typical four-day, ten-person training course starts as low as $3,950 (plus associated travel costs, if any). Unlike our competition, we come to you. You can gain the competitive edge you need to produce higher quality, lower cost proposals.

Wishing you business success,

Frank J. Greco, Ph. D.

President

Premise and Proof

Writing proposals is the art of being persuasive.  In other words, its an attempt to make a premise and prove the primary theme that: you are the most valued customer. This is best accomplished by writing effective themes introduce your explanation.

When attempting to write themes or thesis sentences, try to use the word “because” to link the premise with the proof.  In fact, the use of the word “because” is especially effective because it signals the reader-evaluator to be on the alert for justifying reasons.  (Note:  this last sentence contains a “because”, which is an example of a proof by premise.)  Avoid the repetitious use of “because” (because) it will become tedious to the evaluator.  Variations in cause-and-effect type words are:

  • Since
  • Implies
  • As a result of
  • Causes
  • Equate to
  • Provides the advantages of
  • Results in the benefits of
  • Defines the structure of
  • Satisfies the specification(s) of

The content presented is taken from GRE’s Proposal Training course presented by Dr. Frank Greco. Information regarding GRE’s Proposal Training and similar inquiries can be directed to fjg@grecoinc.com and website www.grecoInc.com.

 

Wishing you business success,

Frank J. Greco, Ph. D.

President

Why Proposals Don’t Win

 

There are several good reasons why proposals are successful and win awards. Here are a sample:

Misinterpretation/Failure to Comply with Specifications

  • Failure to Demonstrate Understanding of Technical Requirements
  • Over-Simplifying Technical Problems
  • Technical Approach Not Feasible with Regard to Time/Cost Constraints
  • Over-Optimism in Proposed Technical Approach
  • Proposal that Promises a Vague Solution, Rather than a Detailed Demonstration of the Technical Approach
  • Evaluation Criteria Issues Missed

Here are Common Potential Problems:

  • Not Visiting Work Site
  • Not Flowing Down/Verifying Subcontractors/Supplies
  • Not Including Clauses, Which Protect Your Interests
    • Escalation
    • Changes
    • Disputes
    • Termination
    • Progress Payments
  • Picking Most Favorable Interpretation of Ambiguous Specs/Drawings

One has to avoid the potential problems when pursuing government contracts. Some of those reasons are not visiting the work site, not flowing down the requirement to your subcontractors, vendors, and suppliers. When flowing down your requirements to teaming members and subcontractors you have to ensure they follow all the clauses and changes that are incorporated into your contract and the best way to do that is to put it in their formal subcontract to your teaming members and suppliers.

Avoid ambiguous terms, drawings, and specification terminology which can be interpreted in a most favorable way that is not in compliance with the contract. If you have this or any other problems with proposals contact Greco Research Engineering Co, Inc. (GRE of Virginia Beach, VA) We improve the proposal process to ensure winning proposal products.

The content presented is taken from GRE’s Proposal Training course presented by Dr. Frank Greco. Information regarding GRE’s Proposal Training and similar inquiries can be directed to fjg@grecoinc.com and website www.grecoInc.com.

 

Wishing you business success,

Frank J. Greco, Ph. D.

President